Tracking Dealer Website Traffic

Your dealership has a web site. Your dealership website has visitors. You even sell car sales from your dealer website. Everything seems to be working: why should you go through the effort to track and analyze your web site traffic?

The fact is, the importance of tracking your dealer website traffic is not stressed nearly enough. At most, internet managers say, “Sure, I track my site traffic. We had 5,000 hits last month!” But that isn’t “tracking your site traffic.” That is a simple statement, and it doesn’t tell you anything about your site or your site traffic.

The importance of tracking your site traffic lies in the fact that proper web traffic analytics will help you answer these key questions: The only analytics we recommend at Dealer e Process is Google analytics. Google is a TRUSTED third party source that deals with data in massive quantities. For business decisions to be made accurately, Google needs accurate data.

Am I reaching my target market?
If you went about developing your web site systematically, you probably spent time researching and defining your target market. You then designed your site to reach those specific people.
But all your research was still – at its base – a hypothesis. You made assumptions about how to reach your customer base. Tracking your site traffic will verify what is actually happening on your site (who is coming and what they are doing), compared to what you expected to happen.

How are people interacting with my site?
Sure, people are coming to your web site. But what are they doing there? Do they hit the home page and leave? Do they go immediately to your free section and never browse your sale items? Do 90% of the people who click on your online payment form subsequently abandon it?

Tracking your site traffic will allow you to see how people proceed through your site, where they spend their time, what they do, and any problems they may be encountering. And that information can help you significantly improve their user experience – and your sales.
Where is my site traffic coming from?

To drive traffic to your site, you are likely engaged in multiple marketing efforts. You may have search engine optimized your content, engaged in article marketing, and developed reciprocal links from key partners. You may be involved in a pay-per-click campaign. Perhaps you also explored email marketing or print advertising.

Web traffic analytics will tell you exactly how successful each and every one of those marketing efforts is. You will then be able to cut the fat from your marketing plan and focus on the most strategic and productive campaigns.

What trends do I see?
The web is a constantly changing place. What worked last year may not work this year. You can’t rely on the mantra “we’ve always done it this way” and expect to see consistently positive results for years on end.

By tracking your site traffic, you will be able to see trends as they unfold: trends in who is coming to your site, how they are interacting with it, what they want, how they buy, etc. You will be able to respond proactively to changing patterns, rather than reactively scrambling to fix a situation after it has become a major problem.

If you are serious about using your dealer website as a tool for business, tracking your site traffic is an absolute essential. The questions above just scratch the surface of what web traffic analytics can do for you.

But the bottom line is this: tracking your site traffic provides you with quantifiable data to allow you to make wise decisions for your business.

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Is Google Changing SEO?

I have been to so many conferences of late, read some great books, watched some great videos on line I thought it might be fun to write what I have noticed recently in the ongoing evolution of the Search Engine industry. To help set the stage – allow me to provide a little background of myself and the auto industry.

That was then…

I was very active in building sports websites in the mid to late 90’s, I know that was decades ago! As a blessing in disguise for what would become one of the main focuses in the auto industry, I learned a great deal about how to help my clients get their websites into good positions on the search engines without using what is referred to today as “Blackhat SEO”. Eventually my interest in developing websites while running fixed operations for 9 years the Gillespie Auto Group.

Through an usual turn of events that led to the formation of  Dealer e Process – I ended up walking away from The Gillespie Auto Group and started Dealer e Process with Mike Gillespie and a couple investors. 2 years later we are currently working with over 250 dealer groups selling a website solution that is TOP in the market.

Our original claim to fame was optimizing our dealer websites for the search engines using the technology I developed when building sports websites in the 90’s.

Having been “in the search (SEO) industry” for nearly a decade, I was certain that it would be alot easier challenge to compete with the likes of car dealerships versus the sporting industry. Auto dealer websites are targeted towards their locations where as sporting websites are targeted for the entire world.

I had learned all the tricks of the trade and all the new do’s and don’ts of modern day SEO. Turns out, there’s a new bag of tricks being used, but the old fashioned, tried and true methods of generating valuable content – still apply today just like they did 10 years ago and are still rewarded when found by the search engines.

So there you have it, an unusual perspective at best. It is really fascinating to see the changes that have taken place in SEO and be in a position to compare them to the way it was a decade ago.

So many companies prey on auto dealers to earn their SEO business because they know a lack of deep knowledge exists at the dealership level.

What follows are some key observations and occasional postulations on where I think the Internet search industry might be headed.

The Hawthorn Effect
For those that aren’t familiar with the term “Hawthorn Effect” here’s a brief definition and explanation.

The term Hawthorn Effect refers to the tendency of some people to work harder and perform better when they are participants in an experiment. Individuals may change their behavior due to the attention they are receiving from researchers rather than because of any manipulation of independent variables.

So… how does this relate to Google in this century?
Google is watching you. I don’t mean in a negative or illicit way – but in a user behavioral and beneficial manner. I just finished reading a book called Planet Google and learned Google is working on several products and projects that will eventually reshape how the search engine will respond to your interaction. Google captures your request for information and measures the response to the data it provides to you. By measuring your response, Google obtains key data that helps them understand how to better manipulate the results that are being returned to you. There are several tools currently in place or that are in various stages of beta testing to help them determine their course of action and refine their process in their effort to produce a better user experience for you – their customer.

One such tool is the “Web History” utility that is now available to all users of Google Search. Using this tool, Google will collect information about the sites you visit and use it to generate a better response to your queries. Some of the key points of the utility are:

1) The ability to view and manage your web activity – search across the full text of the pages you’ve visited, including Google Searches, web pages, images and news stories.
2) Get search results that are more personalized and based on the things you’ve searched for on Google and the sites you’ve visited.
3) Get reports on your trends and web activity – how many searches did you conduct and at what time of the day. Which sites do you frequent the most?
You can read more about the capabilities and features of Web History here: http://www.google.com/psearch

How will Web History affect the Search Engine industry?
It will help Google provide you with results that you want to see the most, and, when combined with another tool in the beta process, will help remove items that you are not interested in seeing in your search results.

Want to try an experiment?
Begin by creating a user account with Google. Then turn Web History on for a week or so, and chase your tail looking at keywords that are specific to the ranking of your website or a site you are maintaining. Check several times a day, closing and relaunching your browser each time you check. Eventually you are going to see a message near the top of the window that the results of your search are being influenced by… you guessed it… Web History. Pay attention to where your site is ranking with Web History turned on.

Now, after a week of allowing “Web History” to collect some information… go to your Google account and turn it off, and check your page positions on Google for the same Keywords? Did you see any difference? You did! Google is watching you and capturing your behavior and they are manipulating your search results to match your expectations and what they perceive is your preference based on the “experiences” they have collected from you. If Web History perceives that blue cars by a particular manufacturer are important to you in the majority of your searches, they will bubble to the top of the page while other Blue Donuts by different manufactures will sink lower and lower.

Is it the end of the Search Engine Optimizing Industry?
Probably not, factors that will account for the appearance of one sites links above another may not be completely limited to the users interaction and preference in the future, other traditional factors such as content and page ranking may continue to play a part in winning the position on the page ahead of some of the clients perceived preferences, in addition to other new developments currently underway.

Does it end here?
I for one don’t think so. There’s at least two more prominent areas where Google can capture user preferences and then modify the result set to meet their expectations, and they are actively testing or running programs to do exactly that right now.

I will be back with more to stay tuned!